Give in to the darkness within.
Rebecca Renfield and her best friend Johanna Seward are reopening an old sanatorium to start their psychology practice when Bec discovers old recordings from a John Seward pertaining to someone with her surname. What she finds in the recordings are unnerving, but their new night-shift doctor promises to provide the distraction Bec needs.
Victoria Draconis is a mysterious, beautiful woman who opens doors into levels of pain, pleasure, and submission that Bec had never imagined existed.



Lily Luchesi is a young author/poet born in Chicago, Illinois, now residing in Los Angeles, California. Ever since she was a toddler her mother noticed her tendency for being interested in all things “dark”. At two she became infatuated with vampires and ghosts, and that infatuation turned into a lifestyle by the time she was twelve, and, as her family has always been what they now call “Gothic”, she doesn’t believe she shall ever change. She is also a hopeless romantic and avid music-love who will always associate vampires with love, blood, and rock and roll.
Her interest in poetry came around the same time as when she was given a book of Edgar Allan Poe’s complete work. She then realized that she had been writing her own poetry since she could hold a pen, and just had not known the correct terms. She finished her first manuscript at the age of fourteen, and was first published at twenty-one.
Her debut novel, Stake-Out (Paranormal Detectives Series Book One), was published by Vamptasy Publishing on May 19th, 2015. Book two, Miranda’s Rights, was released on January 8th, 2016. Book three, Life Sentence, was released on August 2nd, 2016 by Vamptasy Publishing, and book four, Right To Silence, was also just accepted by the publisher and will be released on January 17th, 2017.
She had a short story, “Undead Ever After” in the CHBB Publishing anthology Love Sucks (released on June 13th, 2015). Her first erotic short story, “Have No Fears”, was published in the Hot Ink Press anthology Naughty Bedtime Stories: In Three Words on October 10th, 2015. She will also have a short erotic horror story, “The Devil’s Dozen”, in the Hot Ink Press anthology Death, Love, Lust, which was released on February 4th, 2016. Her horror short “Too Young To Kill” was released in the CHBB Publishing anthology Lurking In The Shadows on June 28th, 2016.
 
 
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My interview with Lawrence Nason Jnr 

 1. How do you dream up your characters and situations?

I believe that most of my characters are based, in part, on people I have met in life and through my travels. I find if I do this it makes the characters feel to be more alive for my readers.
The situations you find in my stories are at time situations I am confronted with or have been confronted with during my lifetime. In my first book Jason the main character relives situations he experienced when his step father beat his mother. I lived through these situations as a child and know the terror that is there for a young and impressionable mind.

2. What are your quirks, so readers can understand you as a writer more than your advertising spiel.

I tend to be more of a smart-alecky person when I interact with people I know. I try to think of and deliver a quirky remark if the situation calls for a little light comic relief. 
I always drink my coffee black and abhor hot tea however I will drink iced tea if the weather is hot enough. 
One thing I do if I do write is I take out my hearing aides (I have lost 50% of my hearing from my days in the army) and tune everything out except for my writing. I try to literally live what I am writing as I write it.

3. How do you develop your characters?
I mentioned before that most of my characters are based on people who I have met. I try to place the characters in the story and give as many of them as possible a unique personality.
They sort of grow as the story goes on and tend to take on a life of their own. 
I will go back hundreds of times and reread what I have written to make sure that each character is doing what they should be doing and if they do something that is out of character for them and the personality that have developed for them. I will write the passage until their reaction is right.

4. What are you reading now?

Believe it or not I am currently rereading the Harry Potter series. The series has turned out to be an exceptionally profitable franchise for its author and every author has the dream to emulate such success.
I just finished Crimson Fire and loved what Mirren did with the story. I am sure I will go back and reread that story again and again.
5. Why do you write and what drives you?

I write because I must. Every author will tell you the same thing. There are stories in each of us just wanting to burst out and be told. The action of writing these stories is like a relief valve for the truly creative and this makes room for other stories to bubble up inside us and rise to the conscious surface.

6. Who inspires you?

One of the persons who inspires me would be Robert A. Heinlein. Heinlein was a superb story teller and wrote many stories that he shared with us.
Another man who inspires me as a writer would be Issac Asimov. The man was a genius and he chose to put this geniality into the worlds he created.
The person who really inspires me is someone who gets knocked down repeatedly in life and gets back up and continues to slug it out until they reach the goal that they have set for themselves. This person is a true inspiration to me and the reason why I still write today.

7. What inspires you?

What inspires me. This is a question that has no simple answer. What inspires me can change from day to day. It can be something as simple as a child saying, ‘Thank You’ for some kind act that has been performed for them or a blue sky on a scorching summer day. 
Inspiration is ever morphing into something else for me and as fluid as molten lava. Sometimes listening to music inspires me or the silence in the middle of the night when I cannot sleep. 

8. Is there a single thread/ idea/ belief which appears everything you write?

I think the single thought that finds its way into every story I write is that anyone, Man, woman, or Child is ever adapting to the situations they face in life. This adaptability is the reason we as mankind can live in some many different climates on the planet. Also, the more terrible things that happen to us the stronger we become. Darwin stated that the strongest of a species will survive and I see this every day in real life.
Another idea that creeps into my writing is that the idea of compassion for each other is a desirable trait to have. Without compassion for your fellow human being you are no better than the most saves lifeform on the planet.
I stated above that experiences in life make us stronger. My belief in this statement is strong. The point is that our adaptability is the strongest trait that we as humans have.

 

9. What book/ story/ movie do you wish you’d written?

I wish I has written the screenplay for “Battlefield Earth”. L Ron Hubbard did an amazing job telling an Epic saga that was butchered in the screen play. There could have been 4 movies made for that book and I believe it could have been a major blockbuster franchise.

10. How often do you think of an idea, but see it’s been done? What do you do?

Like every author out there this happens daily because just about everything has been done before. How many reiterations of “Romeo and Juliet” are out there or “Cinderella”? 
The true genius of every great author is taking a story and giving it a fresh prospective. Sometimes you change the outcome to make thing fresh. What if Romeo had survived and Juliet had died. What if both had survived. 
What if? This is the strongest tool in the tool box of every Author out there. Every story development begins with the question What If… This is what we work with and we try to answer it in a fresh and exiting way to entertain our readers.

 

Review- Welcome to the Apocalypse: Book 1 Pandora 

If you think this book is about gaming, think again. Yes, it’s set in a big computer game gone wrong, but it’s a comment about human nature, and how the worst of circumstances brings out the best and worst of people. DL Richardson is astute in pinning down those emotions and responses. I’ve read previous works from this author and while they’re all good, this is the best so far.
If you love a good sci-fi read, and a mind fuck, then give this a go. Currently 99c.

My interview with KJ Taylor

1. How do you dream up your characters and situations? I start out with a vague idea of what the character is like, and then put them in a situation which will both introduce them to the reader and either establish or advance the plot in some way. As I write the initial scene, the character’s personality will begin to reveal itself to me. (I’ve abandoned more than one book because this didn’t work out and the characters were boring as a result)

2. What are your quirks, so readers can understand you as a writer more than your advertising spiel. I’m a fairly solitary sort but also quite sociable – in other words I enjoy social situations as long as I know I can withdraw at any time, when I start to get tired and want to be by myself again (I get very tetchy if I feel trapped in a situation, or if someone comes bothering me when I’m enjoying some valuable Me time). I also love to collect things, and decorate things.

3. How do you develop your characters? By putting them in different situations and showing how they deal with it, and also by showing how they interact with other characters. Tragedy and peril are a great way to really take it all the way. If a character is put in truly extreme or desperate circumstances, that’s when you find out what they’re really made of (just as it is in real life, of course).  

4. What are you reading now? An Evil Love, by Geoffrey Wansell. It’s a biography of notorious serial killer Fred West. These days I mostly read non-fiction, and I’m fascinated by serial killers not because of their crimes but because of the bizarre ways their minds work.

5. Why do you write and what drives you? I’m just a storyteller by nature and have been since before I could read. I have a lot of imagination, and love learning interesting new things, particularly about nature, history and human nature. What drives me to actually write it all down, however, is twofold. First I simply love doing it, and the second is, to be brutally honest, that I’m a very angry person underneath my apparently cheery nature. I’ve always felt like I had something to prove, to show everyone I’m not a big loser. I know that sounds bad, but in fact anger and frustration can be great motivators when properly channelled into something creative. It also means that whenever I experience a setback, my reaction is to get angry and declare “no! I refuse to give up! To hell with all that!”. So I keep on trying instead of becoming depressed and giving up.

6. Who inspires you? Everyone I know, really. One way or another.

7. What inspires you? Mostly my own thoughts and feelings, and once or twice a dream. Yes, I know “it came to me in a dream!” is about as corny as it gets, but because I’ve spent my entire adult life authoring it’s resulted in me becoming very good at controlling my dreams and prone to lucid dreaming. I’ve formulated entire ideas for novels (and more than one TV show) in my sleep, while being entirely aware of what I was doing. It’s… pretty weird.Unfortunately, this also means that when I have nightmares, I really have nightmares.

8. Is there a single thread/ idea/ belief which appears everything you write? I’ve noticed recurring themes in my books, definitely. One of them is the importance of having the freedom to choose, even in the face of the gods themselves. Another is that of defying your own destiny – a lot of my characters are told they have to be or to do this or that, and they fight back against it no matter how much it costs them. There’s also frequently an undercurrent of nihilism and futility; I don’t tend to write straight-up happy endings. Usually they’re either sad or bittersweet.

9. What book/ story/ movie do you wish you’d written? None. My creations are my own, and I’m not interested in being any writer other than the one I am.

10. How often do you think of an idea, but see it’s been done? What do you do? If it’s something minor, like a character name, I change it. But if it’s something as broad as the basic plot premise, I ignore it and carry on because I know the end result will be different than what the other person wrote.

http://www.kjtaylor.comhttps://www.facebook.com/kjtaylorauthor/

@WorldStitcher 

My interview with Erin Yoshikawa and Mirren Hogan

To celebrate the release of NIghtmares Rise, I sat down with the authors for an interview,.

Do you like cheese?
Erin: As long as it’s not head cheese, yes!

Mirren: Too much, usually with wine or pizza.

What was the last book you read?
Erin:My Education by William S. Burroughs. That, and The Wretched of the Earth by Frantz Fanon. The latter was a gift from a friend.

Mirren: Welcome to the Apocalypse by DL Richardson

What is your favourite flavour of ice cream?
Erin: Any flavor. Seriously. Try me.

Mirren: Chocolate. Are there others?

What is your favourite movie?
Erin: In public, I say The English Patient or Schindler’s List. Privately, it’s Weekend at Bernie’s 2.

Mirren: Back to the Future.

Tea or coffee?
Erin: Both. Mixed together. It’s called a Vader 50/50. Try it!

Mirren: Really Erin? I’ll stick to tea.

Where’s your favourite place to write?
Erin: The dining room table, but only after midnight.

Mirren: The couch, in my lounge room.

What are your hobbies?
Erin: Writing and Willem Dafoe. A person can be a hobby.

Mirren: Walking my dog and my dog. An animal can be a hobby too. 

Which book/s have influenced you the most?
Erin: It’s a toss up between The Prophet by Khalil Gibran and Night by Elie Weisel. There was so much human honesty in both stories but for very different reasons.

Mirren: Every book influences me in some way. 

What is your pet’s name?
Erin: LJ. I don’t keep animals with more than 2 legs or who lack opposable thumbs.

Mirren: Bear, the jack Russell.

Name 4 foods you eat regularly?
Erin: Sandwiches, pho, sandwiches, ice cream. Yes, I know I said sandwiches twice.

Mirren: Cheese, pizza, chocolate, bananas.

Favourite place to be?
Erin: Anywhere I can think comfortably.

Mirren: My house.

Where would you like to go?
Erin: Australia!

Mirren: Hawaii!

Favourite TV show?
Erin: Currently, Westworld or The Man in the High Castle.

Mirren: Anything DC.

Do you own slippers?
Erin: No. Which is strange, because we call flip flops slippers here and everybody wears them but me.

Mirren: Yes, but they live in the cupboard so the dog can’t chew them.

Can you whistle?
Erin: Yes but don’t ask me to whistle at night.

Mirren: Yes, but I don’t.

What is your favourite colour?
Erin: Black

Mirren: Blue

Who is your favourite author?
Erin: Mirren Hogan or Khalil Gibran. I’m leaning towards the former.

Mirren: Erin Yoshikawa!

Would you be a pirate?
Erin: Can I be a space pirate like Captain Harlock or Emeraldas from Galaxy Express 999? If so, then yes.

Mirren: No, I’m a dragon.

Last thing/person that made you laugh?
Erin: My kid. That’s why I keep him around.

Mirren: Either a kid or the dog. He’s a big derp. 

Where would you love to live?
Erin: Ireland. In a quiet cottage with good wifi.

Mirren: My house.

What book are you reading at the moment?
Erin: Histories by Herodotus

Mirren: Beast Within by SL Perrine

Favourite month?
Erin: Any month.

Mirren: I don’t have one either.

Buy NIghtmares Rise from Amazon 

Author bios

Erin Yoshikawa

Erin is a Scorpio born in the year of the rat. She currently resides on a small rock in the middle of the Pacific Ocean with one child and a plethora of native fauna to aid in the writing process. One time rock and roll queen, soup seller, grave digger, and world traveler, Erin enjoys a quiet existence working for The Man while not giving him the satisfaction of killing imagination and dreams. She has contributed to a few anthologies. Nightmares Rise will be her first full-length novel with more to come. Eventually. She hopes. 
Erin Yoshikawa”s author page- https://www.facebook.com/erin.yoshikawa.author/?ref=ts&fref=ts
Mirren Hogan

Author bio 

Mirren Hogan lives in NSW Australia with her husband, two daughters, dog, cat, rabbits and countless birds. She has a Bachelor of Arts (English/ history), a Graduate Diploma of Arts (writing) and a couple of degrees in education. She writes fantasy, urban fantasy and science fiction, as well as historical fiction.
Her debut novel —Crimson Fire was released in October 2016. That was followed by historical fiction Night Witches, and paranormal/ urban fantasy Nightmares Rise (co-authored by Erin Yoshikawa). 
Mirren also had several short stories published and has co-edited two charity anthologies; for breast cancer research and Plan Australia.
Website: Mirrenhogan.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MirrenHoganAuthor/?ref=bookmarks

Twitter: @MirrenHogan

Blog: https://mirrenhoganblog.wordpress.com

Mailing list: http://eepurl.com/cA1PCb

My interview with Erin Yoshikawa 

1. How do you dream up your characters and situations? 

It depends on the work. In some instances, they were facets of my own personality that desperately needed a voice. At other times, I saw a character in a movie or play and found them intriguing. There have been strangers seen or heard from a distance who contributed to characters. The way someone moves or looks at you, the way they react to other emotions, these things all contribute to creating a new mode of thought.

 

Situations are different. At the best times, the situation writes itself. Sometimes it’s easy to move from one point to the next without a lot of planning or direction. At other times, you need to plot the course carefully to make the story flow just the way you want it. Again, characters and situations are not objective concepts. They’re both very subjective.

 

2. What are your quirks, so readers can understand you as a writer more than your advertising spiel.

 

There are so many. When I write, I do it best alone and listening to 90s music. There’s probably a cigarette involved. I don’t drink because it interferes with my creative process. I also tend to go for vegan food when I’m writing.

 

3. How do you develop your characters?

 

It’s a slow process. I start with a gesture or phrase. People have habits, so a character will have repetitive gestures like a real person. A stray thought that doesn’t fit in with my own becomes a sentence from someone else’s mouth. A face usually comes after, although a lot of times it happens concurrently with the gestures. Most people envision a person with a certain mood. Willem Dafoe always comes to mind when I’m trying to express emotional intensity just behind the eyes. But mostly, the character creates itself.

 

4. What are you reading now?

 

Fables by Bill Willingham. It’s a comic series about storybook characters who ended up settling in our world.

 

5. Why do you write and what drives you?

 

I write feelings. And that’s what drives me. If I don’t feel an emotional attachment to a character or feel their emotions, I don’t write them. Emotion is a heady thing like a drug. If I can’t connect to a feeling, the project dies quickly.

 

6. Who inspires you?

 

People. All people at all times.

 

7. What inspires you?

 

Emotion and feeling. Without them, nothing happens. They’re the driving force behind everything.

 

8. Is there a single thread/ idea/ belief which appears everything you write?

 

“Soon, and soon, and soon.” The phrase always pops up in my head. I hear it when a character covets something from a dark place in themselves. And the word ‘castrophony’. It appears on the Demon Days album from the Gorillaz. It means cacophony and catastrophe rolled together, loud hell falling upon everybody’s head. I like that word. It should be used more often.

 

9. What book/ story/ movie do you wish you’d written?

 

None, really. Sometimes I think I could have done a story better, improved on the dialogue, amped up the emotional impact of a scene. But for the most part no. People have their ideas and I have mine.

 

10. How often do you think of an idea, but see it’s been done? What do you do?

 

All the time. For the most part, I’m content to let the idea go. But occasionally I’ll be open to letting my own ideas about the subject happen and bring something new to the world. Every idea you or I have had has already been had by someone else. It just hasn’t been told with your own voice. I suppose that’s the lesson here: use your own voice. Tell your stories. Don’t be afraid of your feelings.


Erin is a Scorpio born in the year of the rat. She currently resides on a small rock in the middle of the Pacific Ocean with one child and a plethora of native fauna to aid in the writing process. One time rock and roll queen, soup seller, grave digger, and world traveler, Erin enjoys a quiet existence working for The Man while not giving him the satisfaction of killing imagination and dreams. She has contributed to a few anthologies. Nightmares Rise will be her first full-length novel with more to come. Eventually. She hopes. 
Erin Yoshikawa”s author page- https://www.facebook.com/erin.yoshikawa.author/?ref=ts&fref=ts